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The Most Important Malay Movements You’ve Never Heard Of

Could movements like Abim and Ikram be the key to Malaysian unity?

IT’S probably a safe bet to say anywhere from 50% to 90% of non-Malays have either never heard of Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (Abim) or Pertubuhan Ikram Malaysia (Ikram), or are generally unfamiliar with what they stand for.

Both organisations have some roots in the Islamic revivalism that emerged in the 1920s and 1930s

Abim is a youth based organisation established in 1971. PKR president Anwar Ibrahim is perhaps the most well known of the many figures that have emerged from the ranks of Abim, which was the platform that arguably launched his public profile as a leader.

Ikram is a consolidation of education and humanitarian NGOs that began with and were affiliated with Jamaah Islah Malaysia, which was established in 1990 and streamlined into Ikram in 2009.

Both Abim and Ikram share a number of similarities. Both were established to promote Islamic revivalism, and both have a strong, active grassroots network engaged in improving the day to day lives of Malaysians on the ground.

Perhaps most importantly, both have publicly and consistently been taking moderate, progressive positions.

Being part of a number of non-Malay/Muslim WhatsApp groups, I remain completely convinced that Islamaphobia is a very real thing. Similarly, my Malay Muslim friends tell me that they receive similar anti non-Malay/Muslim content all the time. This is all part of a global trend of increasing xenophobia all around.

On the subject of increasing Islamisation in Malaysia, I take the likely unpopular view (for people of my background anyway), that the more genuinely Islamic our government, the better.

Note: genuinely.

I feel there is little value in dressing up our institutions with the outward trappings of religion, unless it is accompanied by the true values and principles that said religion preaches.

In that vein, I feel that the more genuinely Muslim a leader is, the more likely that leader will walk the straight and narrow path of integrity.

I would be more than happy with a staunch and pious Muslim at the helm of a government, because such a leader fears God above all else.

Fearing God means that a truly Muslim leader would be truly convinced that he or she is being constantly watched and judged at every second by an omniscient and omnipotent divine being, and is constantly conscious that the fires of hell (literally) await those who betray the trust of the people.

There is no bigger incentive that the rest of us, as mere mortals, can give to such a leader in order to ensure honest and compassionate governance.

If we can therefore accept that the proliferation of genuine Islamic values and principles could be a positive thing for the government and for Malaysia, perhaps we are step closer to being more open minded about movements that some would label “Islamist”, including organisations like Abim and Ikram.

By now, we are all too familiar with the somewhat more divisive and exclusionist narratives of Isma, Umno, and today’s PAS, among others.

Those few who take the opportunity to actually listen to the things that Abim and Ikram say (and to Malays notably, not just to non-Malay crowds) may be surprised to find a completely different narrative emerging from these two Islamist movements.

From Ikram, I recall in particular statements about the recognition of the UEC, and the buy Muslim first campaign.

The official statement on the UEC reflected serious efforts to reach out to Chinese educationists in order to understand the UEC from head to toe before making wild and inflammatory statements. It was ultimately more balanced, and more reconciliatory than almost anything I have seen emerge from a Malay majority organisation.

With regards to the buy Muslim first campaign, Ikram Youth leader Hafiz Abd Hamid wrote that that buying Muslim first was fine, but that boycotting products from other races and religions was something that was negative and ultimately unhelpful to Malaysia on multiple levels.

Abim took a similar position, stating that they support buying Muslim products, but were against boycotting non-Muslim products.

In the aftermath of the Icerd fiasco, then Abim secretary general Faisal Aziz (now Abim president) took the more middle ground position that despite rejecting Icerd, the government should incorporate some elements from Icerd into a new law against discrimination that were in line with the Federal Constitution.

Where outreach is concerned, Ikram is a key member of Gabungan Bertindak Malaysia (GBM), a unique coalition consisting of NGOs that represent a wide range of communities on the ethnoreligious spectrum. This is in line with Ikram’s emphasis on the concept of Negara Rahmah - a nation based on compassion and benevolence.

Abim meanwhile organised a large event in Bangi last week, called Seminar Bangsa Malaysia. The term ‘Bangsa Malaysia’ is itself controversial in the Malay community. Many might say that the concept represents an erosion of ‘Bangsa Melayu’.

Nonetheless, Abim forged bravely ahead. Listening to the speeches of their leaders all morning that Saturday, it was clear that their approach to Islam and leadership was one that emphasised the spirit of inclusiveness and openness towards non-Malays and non-Muslims.

Alongside recognising and being committed to defending all existing provisions regarding Islam and the Malays, this approach recognised the contributions of non-Malays and stated clearly a willingness to work together not for the benefit or detriment of any one race, but for the betterment of all.

Both Abim and Ikram have taken very clear and public (if not always well publicised) positions that emphasise a rejection of the politics of division, in lieu of a recognition that we are all in the same boat, and need to find a way to replace mistrust with empathy and mutual understanding.

On a more practical level, the significance of this is the demographic that these organisations represent.

We have seen more than a handful of very liberal and progressive Malays, whose aggressive and bold positions have made them the darlings of non-Malays throughout the country.

The only “problem” is, such figures (while undoubtedly true Malays, and very nice people) seldom represent or appeal to the wider Malay demographic – and certainly nowhere on the scale at which grassroots organisations like Abim and Ikram do.

This makes them uniquely positioned to provide an important contrasting narrative to the one in which ultras on both side of the divide seem intent on fanning flames and letting the social fabric of Malaysia burn down all around us.

God knows we’ve had enough of that. It’s time for leaders with credible credentials and values steeped in compassion and mutual respect to come to the fore.

Nathaniel Tan is a strategic communications consultant who specialises in identifying the right goals, and the right tools for achieving that job. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Sources:- https://www.thestar.com.my

'Sindrom Cicak' Faktor Halang Perpaduan Rakyat Malaysia

Alyaa Alhadjri & Shakira Buang (Sumber:-https://www.malaysiakini.com/news/497501)

Diterbitkan 26 Okt 2019, 6:37 petang | Dikemaskini 26 Okt 2019, 6:47 petang

Seorang doktor yang bercakap di sebuah seminar mengenai pembinaan negara hari ini membuat diagnosis mengenai faktor yang menghalang perpaduan rakyat Malaysia.

Walaupun topik perbincangan yang serius, ahli-ahli NGO Islam ABIM, Wadah dan PKPIM yang hadir bagi Ijtimak Harakiy kali keenam ketawa ketika ahli panel Prof Dr Suresh Kumar Govind mula meniru bunyi cicak bagi menerangkan hujahnya.

Suresh Kumar, penyelaras Kumpulan Persahabatan Khidmat Antara Agama (FGIS), berkata usaha membina negara hanya boleh digerakkan dengan perubahan minda daripada hanya menunjukkan simpati kepada turut merasa empati.

"(Untuk menunjukkan) simpati senang, (anda lihat seseorang yang) belum makan selama satu atau dua hari? Ckckckck, kesiannya,
"Dalam istilah perubatan kita menyebutnya sebagai sindrom cicak," kata Suresh Kumar yang bercakap pada panel yang bertajuk "Pembinaan Bangsa Malaysia: Cabaran, Arah dan Masa Depan".

Menurutnya, perasaan empati akan diterjemahkan kepada usaha untuk membantu orang lain yang memerlukan.

"Empati adalah ketika kita melihat seseorang yang belum makan, kita bersedia membawa mereka ke restoran untuk makan, kerana kita juga dapat merasakan kelaparan mereka," katanya.

"Sekiranya kita hanya melihat masalah rakyat dari jauh, kita akan gagal membantu membina negara," kata Suresh Kumar.

Pada penghujung majlis, ijtimak meluluskan resolusi empat perkara yang bertumpu sekitar sejarah pembangunan negara di Malaysia.

Resolusi itu ialah:

  1. Menginsafi bahawasanya pembinaan bangsa Malaysia mempunyai sejarahnya tersendiri yang perlu digali dan dicerna untuk diterjemahkan semula kepada masyarakat. Dalam mendidik masyarakat, adalah perlu untuk memberi penekanan kepada pentingnya memahami sejarah dan identiti bangsa untuk mengembalikan semangat ta'awun dan menyantuni kepelbagaian yang wujud dalam masyarakat agar terus relevan sebagai bangsa yang terbuka tanpa menggadaikan prinsip syariah dan perundangan yang digariskan.                  
  2. Menyedari bahawa, selaku ahli masyarakat dalam sebuah negara berperlembagaan dan berpegang kepada rukun negara yang bermula dengan kepercayaan kepada Tuhan, maka kita mempunyai taklif syarak untuk berperanan sebagai tulang belakang bangsa untuk mengangkat nila-nilai universal dan inklusif yang dianjurkan oleh agama dalam membina negara dan bangsa yang damai, sejahtera serta menerima nila-nilai kebersamaan.                                                                                                                                                                       
  3. Menyeru bahawa reformasi intelektual mengenai kefahaman negara bangsa mesti diterapkan dengan asas akidah yang sahih, menyedari tanggungjawab sebagai hamba Allah yang berperanan untuk menyebarkan dakwah dengan hikmah, bersifat kosmopolitan dan terbuka diikuti dengan aspek idealisme, aktivisme, dan spiritualisme yang berorientasikan nilai dan etika.                                                                    
  4. Menyedari bahawa reformasi dalam bentuk politik juga adalah satu keperluan, khususnya dengan mewujudkan agensi-agensi yang menyokong agenda ini bagi mengurus dan merencanakan program serta dasar demi meningkatkan kefahaman masyarakat tentang bangsa Malaysia.
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The Most Important Malay Movements You’ve Never Heard Of

Could movements like Abim and Ikram be the key to Malaysian unity?

IT’S probably a safe bet to say anywhere from 50% to 90% of non-Malays have either never heard of Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (Abim) or Pertubuhan Ikram Malaysia (Ikram), or are generally unfamiliar with what they stand for.

Both organisations have some roots in the Islamic revivalism that emerged in the 1920s and 1930s

Abim is a youth based organisation established in 1971. PKR president Anwar Ibrahim is perhaps the most well known of the many figures that have emerged from the ranks of Abim, which was the platform that arguably launched his public profile as a leader.

Ikram is a consolidation of education and humanitarian NGOs that began with and were affiliated with Jamaah Islah Malaysia, which was established in 1990 and streamlined into Ikram in 2009.

Both Abim and Ikram share a number of similarities. Both were established to promote Islamic revivalism, and both have a strong, active grassroots network engaged in improving the day to day lives of Malaysians on the ground.

Perhaps most importantly, both have publicly and consistently been taking moderate, progressive positions.

Being part of a number of non-Malay/Muslim WhatsApp groups, I remain completely convinced that Islamaphobia is a very real thing. Similarly, my Malay Muslim friends tell me that they receive similar anti non-Malay/Muslim content all the time. This is all part of a global trend of increasing xenophobia all around.

On the subject of increasing Islamisation in Malaysia, I take the likely unpopular view (for people of my background anyway), that the more genuinely Islamic our government, the better.

Note: genuinely.

I feel there is little value in dressing up our institutions with the outward trappings of religion, unless it is accompanied by the true values and principles that said religion preaches.

In that vein, I feel that the more genuinely Muslim a leader is, the more likely that leader will walk the straight and narrow path of integrity.

I would be more than happy with a staunch and pious Muslim at the helm of a government, because such a leader fears God above all else.

Fearing God means that a truly Muslim leader would be truly convinced that he or she is being constantly watched and judged at every second by an omniscient and omnipotent divine being, and is constantly conscious that the fires of hell (literally) await those who betray the trust of the people.

There is no bigger incentive that the rest of us, as mere mortals, can give to such a leader in order to ensure honest and compassionate governance.

If we can therefore accept that the proliferation of genuine Islamic values and principles could be a positive thing for the government and for Malaysia, perhaps we are step closer to being more open minded about movements that some would label “Islamist”, including organisations like Abim and Ikram.

By now, we are all too familiar with the somewhat more divisive and exclusionist narratives of Isma, Umno, and today’s PAS, among others.

Those few who take the opportunity to actually listen to the things that Abim and Ikram say (and to Malays notably, not just to non-Malay crowds) may be surprised to find a completely different narrative emerging from these two Islamist movements.

From Ikram, I recall in particular statements about the recognition of the UEC, and the buy Muslim first campaign.

The official statement on the UEC reflected serious efforts to reach out to Chinese educationists in order to understand the UEC from head to toe before making wild and inflammatory statements. It was ultimately more balanced, and more reconciliatory than almost anything I have seen emerge from a Malay majority organisation.

With regards to the buy Muslim first campaign, Ikram Youth leader Hafiz Abd Hamid wrote that that buying Muslim first was fine, but that boycotting products from other races and religions was something that was negative and ultimately unhelpful to Malaysia on multiple levels.

Abim took a similar position, stating that they support buying Muslim products, but were against boycotting non-Muslim products.

In the aftermath of the Icerd fiasco, then Abim secretary general Faisal Aziz (now Abim president) took the more middle ground position that despite rejecting Icerd, the government should incorporate some elements from Icerd into a new law against discrimination that were in line with the Federal Constitution.

Where outreach is concerned, Ikram is a key member of Gabungan Bertindak Malaysia (GBM), a unique coalition consisting of NGOs that represent a wide range of communities on the ethnoreligious spectrum. This is in line with Ikram’s emphasis on the concept of Negara Rahmah - a nation based on compassion and benevolence.

Abim meanwhile organised a large event in Bangi last week, called Seminar Bangsa Malaysia. The term ‘Bangsa Malaysia’ is itself controversial in the Malay community. Many might say that the concept represents an erosion of ‘Bangsa Melayu’.

Nonetheless, Abim forged bravely ahead. Listening to the speeches of their leaders all morning that Saturday, it was clear that their approach to Islam and leadership was one that emphasised the spirit of inclusiveness and openness towards non-Malays and non-Muslims.

Alongside recognising and being committed to defending all existing provisions regarding Islam and the Malays, this approach recognised the contributions of non-Malays and stated clearly a willingness to work together not for the benefit or detriment of any one race, but for the betterment of all.

Both Abim and Ikram have taken very clear and public (if not always well publicised) positions that emphasise a rejection of the politics of division, in lieu of a recognition that we are all in the same boat, and need to find a way to replace mistrust with empathy and mutual understanding.

On a more practical level, the significance of this is the demographic that these organisations represent.

We have seen more than a handful of very liberal and progressive Malays, whose aggressive and bold positions have made them the darlings of non-Malays throughout the country.

The only “problem” is, such figures (while undoubtedly true Malays, and very nice people) seldom represent or appeal to the wider Malay demographic – and certainly nowhere on the scale at which grassroots organisations like Abim and Ikram do.

This makes them uniquely positioned to provide an important contrasting narrative to the one in which ultras on both side of the divide seem intent on fanning flames and letting the social fabric of Malaysia burn down all around us.

God knows we’ve had enough of that. It’s time for leaders with credible credentials and values steeped in compassion and mutual respect to come to the fore.

Nathaniel Tan is a strategic communications consultant who specialises in identifying the right goals, and the right tools for achieving that job. He can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Sources:- https://www.thestar.com.my

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Calls To Remove Modi Ring Out At Kashmir Protests In KL

Two demonstrations were held in Kuala Lumpur today over India's withdrawal of autonomy for Kashmir and flooding of the region with military personnel. A demonstration involving some 100 people at Masjid Negara after Friday prayers saw protesters chanting "Hidup Kashmir" (long live Kashmir) and calling for the removal of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

Protest leader and Muslim Youth Movement (Abim) president Mohamad Raimi Ab Rahim urged Parliament to speak up against the persecution of Muslims in Kashmir. "Why are our MPs keeping quiet? Even MPs in UK are protesting against what is happening in Kashmir," he told the press.

Abim, in representing 40 NGOs, later submitted a protest note to the Indian High Commission. Across town, another group of 20 protesters gathered in front of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) embassy to protest against the country's decision to grant its highest award - Order of Zayed - to Modi.

Protest leader and president of Ikatan Rakyat Muslim Malaysia (Irimm) Amir Amsaa Alla Pitcay said Malaysians were concerned about the possibility of Kashmir becoming "another Palestine". The protesters had attempted to submit a protest note signed by 42 organisations to the embassy, but were not entertained by any of the embassy staff.

The group had initially planned to submit a protest note to the Saudi Arabian embassy, but called off the event after being ignored by the UAE embassy. Their message for the Saudis, according to Amir Amsaa, was that Riyadh should raise the plight of Kashmiris to the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation and the United Nations. Kashmir is a Himalayan region which has been subjected to territorial conflict since the partition of India and Pakistan in 1947.

The Muslim-majority region of Jammu and Kashmir is Indian territory, but was granted special "temporary" autonomy under Article 370 of the Indian Constitution.

On Aug 5, 2019, the Indian government revoked the special status granted to Jammu and Kashmir. Following this, New Delhi had cut off communication in the region, increased military presence and locked up local political leaders. Kashmiris are concerned that ceding control of the territory to New Delhi would open the floodgates to land grabs by outsiders. Malaysia Kini.

Giving Youths A Voice In Electoral Reforms

KUANTAN: Raub UiTM recently took part in a national seminar held in Parliament to empower youths on electoral reforms. The seminar titled “Electoral System Reforms: Benefits for the Young Generation” was jointly organised by the Muslim Youth Movement of Malaysia (Abim), Raub UiTM’s Administrative Science and Policy Studies Faculty (FSPPP), Coalition for Free and Fair Elections (Bersih 2.0) and the National Union Of Malaysian Muslim Students.

Raub UiTM said in a statement that the programme was aimed at ensuring the voice of youths were not left behind in the government and NGOs’ efforts to bring about election reforms in Malaysia. It said the programme was also to increase awareness and knowledge of the participants on the subject matter. FSPPP studies centre head Che Hamdan Che Mohd Razali (pic) said students had the opportunity to feel the atmosphere of a scholarly discussion in Parliament other than just studying in classrooms.

“In addition, this programme provides a space for students to offer their opinions on electoral reforms,” he said. Among the topics discussed were political education for the young generation, improvements to the electoral system and the role of civil society in election reforms.

There was also a dialogue session with Deputy Youth and Sports Minister Steven Sim Chee Keong. Up to 220 participants took part in the programme, including FSPPP students, lecturers and alumni as well as the public.

Read more at https://www.thestar.com.my/metro/metro-news/2019/03/13/giving-youths-a-voice-in-electoral-reforms#qu8GdvB15IMWy11Z.99

People’s Republic of China Must Stop All Attrocities Against Muslim Uyghurs In Xinjiang.

The Muslim Youth Movement of Malaysia (ABIM) urges the People's Republic of China to immediately release all Uyghur Muslims from detention camps in Xinjiang province. ABIM also calls for all detention centres and camps to be closed immediately. This call is made in conjunction with the anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on October 1, 2019.

It was also on October 1, 1949 that East Turkestan was incorporated into China and renamed Xinjiang. The ongoing humanitarian tragedy of the Uyghur minority Muslims is already widely known throughout the world. ABIM considers the revelations and disclosures in the various forms of testimony and evidence have seriously undermined the international community’s confidence in the government of the People's Republic of China concerning human rights.

The atrocities committed against the Uyghur ethnic groups in the detention camps go beyond the norms of humanity and result in psychological stress, depression, and trauma among these ethnic people.

To this day, Uyghur communities outside of China are still being denied access to information and blocked from communication which have left them separated from millions of their family members in Xinjiang.

These Uyghur communities have also been denied the right as citizens from possessing passports that would allow them to travel freely including returning home legally. As a major force expanding its influence internationally, the actions of the Government of the People's Republic of China are contrary to fundamental values of human rights held by the universal community. The international community is also keeping abreast of developments in Hong Kong.

The world is observing every policy implemented by the government of the People's Republic of China in both regions. ABIM fears that every move by the Chinese government is a reflection of the policies and values that the country wants to address as a new universal reference norm.

On that basis, ABIM urges Malaysians and the world community to reject any form of normalization that seeks to justify the inhumanity of the Government of the People's Republic of China in particular to its mistreatment of the Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang.

ABIM strongly implores the Malaysian government and the Muslim world to continue to increase political pressure so that atrocities on the Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang shall be ceased and their release from detention camps be achieved.

The millions of Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic groups should have the right to live freely as dignified people as any other citizen in the People’s Republic of China.

Muhammad Faisal Abdul Aziz, Secretary General, Muslim Youth Movesment of Malaysia (ABIM).

People’s Republic of China Must Stop All Attrocities Against Muslim Uyghurs In Xinjiang.

The Muslim Youth Movement of Malaysia (ABIM) urges the People's Republic of China to immediately release all Uyghur Muslims from detention camps in Xinjiang province. ABIM also calls for all detention centres and camps to be closed immediately. This call is made in conjunction with the anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China on October 1, 2019.

It was also on October 1, 1949 that East Turkestan was incorporated into China and renamed Xinjiang. The ongoing humanitarian tragedy of the Uyghur minority Muslims is already widely known throughout the world. ABIM considers the revelations and disclosures in the various forms of testimony and evidence have seriously undermined the international community’s confidence in the government of the People's Republic of China concerning human rights.

The atrocities committed against the Uyghur ethnic groups in the detention camps go beyond the norms of humanity and result in psychological stress, depression, and trauma among these ethnic people.

To this day, Uyghur communities outside of China are still being denied access to information and blocked from communication which have left them separated from millions of their family members in Xinjiang.

These Uyghur communities have also been denied the right as citizens from possessing passports that would allow them to travel freely including returning home legally. As a major force expanding its influence internationally, the actions of the Government of the People's Republic of China are contrary to fundamental values of human rights held by the universal community. The international community is also keeping abreast of developments in Hong Kong.

The world is observing every policy implemented by the government of the People's Republic of China in both regions. ABIM fears that every move by the Chinese government is a reflection of the policies and values that the country wants to address as a new universal reference norm.

On that basis, ABIM urges Malaysians and the world community to reject any form of normalization that seeks to justify the inhumanity of the Government of the People's Republic of China in particular to its mistreatment of the Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang.

ABIM strongly implores the Malaysian government and the Muslim world to continue to increase political pressure so that atrocities on the Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang shall be ceased and their release from detention camps be achieved.

The millions of Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic groups should have the right to live freely as dignified people as any other citizen in the People’s Republic of China.

Muhammad Faisal Abdul Aziz, Secretary General, Muslim Youth Movesment of Malaysia (ABIM).

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Celik CPR bantu hadapi serangan jantung Featured

Sep 30, 2019
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Celik CPR bantu hadapi serangan jantung

KUALA LUMPUR 29 Sept. – Menyedari serangan jantung semakin meningkat setiap tahun, Hospital Pakar Al-Islam mengadakan program celik bantuan awal kecemasan Resutasi Kardiopulmonari (CPR) di Masjid Jamek Kampung Baru di sini, semalam.

Program itu diadakan dengan kerjasama Malaysian Relief Agency (MRA) dan Persatuan Resusitasi Malaysia (MyRes) bertemakan 'Menyelamatkan Satu Nyawa Umpama Menyelamatkan Seluruh Umat'.

Presiden MRA, Dr. Mohd. Daud Sulaiman berkata, objektif program itu adalah meningkatkan kadar nyawa terselamat daripada serangan jantung mengejut yang berlaku di ruang awam, masjid dan pasar raya dengan menggunakan teknik CPR serta peranti AED (Automated External Defibrillator).

“Program julung kali diadakan itu melibatkan penglibatkan lebih 300 orang peserta daripada pelbagai lapisan masyarakat. “Ia juga diadakan sempena 'FIMA-Global Lifesavers Day' yang diadakan serentak pada hari sama di beberapa negara seperti Malaysia, Indonesia, Pakistan, United Kingdom dan Afrika Selatan,” katanya.

Program itu mendapat kerjasama daripada beberapa organisasi lain seperti Jabatan Agama Islam Wilayah Persekutuan (JAWI), Angakatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) dan Jawatan kuasa Masjid Jamek Kg.Baru.

Mengulas lanjut, Mohd. Daud berkata, Insiden sindrom koronari akut (ACS) termasuk serangan jantung (AMI) berlaku sebanyak 47.1 kes bagi setiap 100,000 penduduk, menjadikan anggaran 15,260 kes bagi 32.4 juta rakyat Malaysia. UTUSAN ONLINE

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Masyarakat Orang Asli Dibantu Lanjutkan Pelajaran Dalam Diploma Pengajian Islam

 Tawar Orang Asli, Mualaf Ambil Diploma

MADRASAH Pengajian Islam (MPI) - Islamic Outreach ABIM Kelantan, Kok Lanas memberi penekanan kepada penuntut Orang Asli dan saudara baru untuk melanjutkan pengajian ke peringkat diploma dalam pengajian Islam.

Pengerusinya, Hassan Awang berkata, bermula bulan ini, seramai 13 penuntut sedang mengikuti pengajian di kolej di Kampung Kuau, Bachok yang diwakafkan oleh individu. Katanya, sebelum ini, Pusat Latihan dan Dakwah Orang Asli (PULDOA) hanya menawarkan pengajian di peringkat sijil sahaja.

“Di peringkat diploma, tempoh pengajian yang perlu diikuti adalah selama tiga tahun berbanding peringkat sijil yang mengambil masa tujuh tahun bergantung kepada kemampuan pelajar. “Selain pelajar Orang Asli dan saudara baru, kita juga mensasarkan penuntut dari Kemboja yang ingin mendalami ilmu agama di sini sekali gus dapat membimbing komuniti di kawasan mereka setelah tamat pengajian nanti,” katanya.

Beliau berkata demikian ketika ditemui selepas Majlis Penyerahan Sumbangan Barangan Elektrik oleh Kemudi Timur Elektronik Sdn Bhd yang dirasmikan Pengarah Urusan Kemudi Timur, Shabki Abdullah di Outreach ABIM Kelantan, Kok Lanas, Kota Bharu, hari ini.

Sementara itu, Shabki berkata, dalam majlis berkenaan, pihaknya turut menyampaikan sebuah televisyen sebagai alat bantu mengajar supaya penuntut Orang Asli di pusat ini mengetahui perkembangan semasa.

“Penyerahan sumbangan ini adalah rentetan daripada program Kibar Jalur Gemilang yang diadakan bersama kira-kira 100 pelajar Orang Asli Islamic Outreach ABIM pada bulan lalu.

“Program tanggungjawab sosial korporat (CSR) ini sudah lebih 10 tahun dijalankan oleh syarikat kami untuk berkongsi keuntungan yang diperolehi syarikat bersama komuniti setempat,” katanya.

Artikel ini disiarkan pada : Rabu, 25 September 2019 @ 3:47 PM

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Pertahankan Kepentingan Sektor Pertanian Negara

KENYATAAN MEDIA ANGKATAN BELIA ISLAM MALAYSIA (ABIM)

19 September 2019 / 19 Muharram 1441 H

PINDAAN AKTA PERLINDUNGAN VARIETI BARU TUMBUHAN 2004: ABIM GESA PERUNDINGAN SECARA MELUAS UNTUK LINDUNGI PETANI DAN JAGA KEPENTINGAN SEKTOR PERTANIAN NEGARA.

Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) merujuk kepada usaha untuk meminda Akta Perlindungan Varieti Baru Tumbuhan 2004 dijangka akan dibentangkan oleh pihak kerajaan. Pindaan ini dilaporkan sebagai persediaan untuk negara ini menyertai Konvensyen International Union For The Protection of New Varieties of Plants (UPOV) 1991 dengan menyelaras undang-undang berkenaan menepati kehendak konvensyen tersebut.

ABIM menilai penyertaan Malaysia dalam konvensyen UPOV adalah tidak jauh beza dengan penyertaan Malaysia ke dalam mana-mana triti atau perjanjian perdagangan antarabangsa. Justeru, penyertaan Malaysia dalam perkara seperti ini sudah tentu akan melibatkan persoalan kepentingan dan kedaulatan negara.

Maka, ia harus melibatkan rundingan dengan semua pihak secara meluas. ABIM bimbang dengan penyertaan Malaysia akan membuka kepada monopoli biji benih oleh syarikat atau badan asing apabila kita terikat dengan peraturan luar yang ditetapkan UPOV.

Selain itu, ABIM juga khuatir terhadap masa depan petani tempatan termasuk golongan petani kecil apabila Malaysia menyertai UPOV. Mengambil contoh laporan Human Rights Impact Assessment (HRIA) UPOV ’91, batasan yang dikenakan UPOV terhadap penggunaan, pertukaran dan penjualan varieti tumbuhan dan biji benih akan menyukarkan petani tempatan mendapat akses kepada biji benih yang lebih baik dari sektor pertanian berdaftar dan seterusnya mengakibatkan petani boleh hilang punca pendapatan.

Dalam kajian kes di beberapa negara, peraturan UPOV ini mengakibatkan petani terpaksa membayar kos lebih empat kali ganda untuk mendapatkan biji benih kerana petani tidak lagi dibenarkan menggunakan cara konvensional bagi mendapatkan biji benih yang lebih berkualiti.

Menurut Seksyen 31 (1) (e ) Akta Perlindungan Varieti Baru Tumbuhan 2004, pengecualian diberikan kepada petani dengan jelas kepada “apa-apa pertukaran bahan pembiakan dalam amaun yang munasabah di kalangan petani-petani kecil”.

Namun, sekiranya Malaysia ingin menyertai UPOV, maka dikhuatiri peruntukan ini akan dibuang untuk memastikan undang-undang Malaysia mengikuti piawaian dan peraturan yang ditetapkan UPOV.

Justeru, ABIM menggesa agar semua pihak diberikan hak untuk dirunding sebelum apa-apa keputusan yang ingin dibuat kerajaan sama ada menyertai UPOV atau meminda undang-undang Malaysia untuk selaras dengan kehendak UPOV.

MOHAMAD RAIMI AB RAHIM

Presiden, Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM).

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