Sinar Ramadhan 1438H

Baik Pulih & Naik Taraf Sekretariat ABIM Pusat Featured

Aug 12, 2020
Hit: 1
Written by
Read 1 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
What I Learned From ABIM

 

ALL THE PIECES MATTER

Thursday, 06 Aug 2020
By Nathaniel Tan
TODAY, the sixth of August, is the Muslim Youth Movement Malaysia’s (Abim) 49th anniversary.
In the past year or so, I’ve gotten to know the organisation and its leaders quite well. Long story short, it’s been a fascinating and inspiring journey.
I’ll share three things I’ve learned from Abim for now: successful models of grassroots activism, the ways in which religion can play a positive role in activism and governance, and the value of personal bonds in a movement.
Before I continue, it is very much worth noting that a lot of these qualities and lessons can be found in other similar organisations and movements – be it other religious-based movements like Pertubuhan Ikram Malaysia, or secular grassroots movements like Liga Rakyat Demokratik.
I assume none of the rest are celebrating their anniversary today as well, so I hope it’s okay if I focus on the one organisation here.
The initial model that inspired the founding of many movements like Abim is of course that of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.
The Muslim Brotherhood is not without controversy, and the many similar organisations founded across the world share different levels of affiliations with the Muslim Brotherhood today.
A defining feature of these movements mirrors the manner in which Islam emphasises being an all-encompassing way of life, in that it is common for these movements to be involved in a wide array of activities.
These include, but are not limited to, the founding of institutions of learning (from preschools to universities), hospitals, charities, social service centres, and so on. (It is worth noting that PAS operates in this manner as well, and in this sense is extremely different from any other political party in Malaysia).
What makes these organisations a little different from many which work in a similar space within civil society is the manner in which they are financially self-sustaining. In this regard, they are perhaps more similar to social enterprises than to “NGOs”, as we commonly understand the term.
I think this is an important and very useful quality, in forming a long term, sustainable movement. It is a completely different model than having to rely on grants, charity, or other types of handouts, and imbues the organisation with a certain degree of pride and dignity that inspires a particular type of confidence amongst its members.
I might summarise my second point in the saying: “You Islam, I okay”.
I believe Islamophobia is a very real thing, especially among non-Muslims (like myself) in Malaysia.
I’m not saying that there aren’t people here and around the world who do try to force their religion on you in insidious ways. It happens with Muslims, just as it happens with Christians and various other religions in pockets all over the world.
That said, I think it is always, always helpful to not paint everyone who shares a label with the same brush.
One of my more profound experiences with Abim was accompanying them in the delivery of some food aid during the movement control order (MCO) period.
This was one of a regular set of engagements that Abim has had with the NGO Pertubuhan Pembangunan Kebajikan dan Persekitaran Positif Malaysia (SEED), which describes itself as the “first trans-led community based organisation in Malaysia”.
SEED has an office in an area of Chow Kit (in Kuala Lumpur) some might describe as seedy, and serves communities like transgenders and “women of socially excluded communities”.
These are not the types of people that you would imagine an Islamist organisation going out of its way to help.
I can personally bear witness to the fact that there was no preaching, no handing out of pamphlets, and no attempting to convert or get people to “repent”. (I imagine there is no way SEED would have let them do that anyway).
There was only the giving out of very large boxes (sponsored by other donors in this case, I believe) of food and supplies – boxes that I was nowhere near strong enough to help carry for the entirety of the time.
I think the experience was just one of many I had that really ran counter to the narrative that all Islamic organisations are the same, that they all want to convert you, and so on.
This was one of many times that I saw a focus on Islamic principles and values, rather than the outward manifestations and trappings. I saw firsthand so many times the emphasis on compassion and aid to all who suffer – not just all who look or talk like them, or shared the same beliefs.
I think religious revivalism is a very real phenomenon – but also not necessarily one that needs to be as polarising as it has been in the past. As what may be a growing number of Malaysians are putting religion in the centre of their lives, it is vital that we continue to build bridges and recognise the common humanity between those who have different views on religion and secularism.
Thus far, I have found the people at Abim to be amazing partners in this endeavour, and I think if you take the time to get to know them yourselves, you are likely to have a similar experience.
I have spent a fair amount of time reflecting on and experiencing firsthand how movements and organisations work.
I confess, I’ve sat through countless meetings where I’m quietly watching mini ego wars and power plays unfold, thinking to myself this group is not really going anywhere – and seeing firsthand how trust deficits really scuttle even the best intentions.
Abim’s leaders are nowhere near perfect. I’m not here to over romanticise them, or paint them as some sort of angels.
But what I have observed is the value of being together, working towards the same goals, for a long time. What I’ve really been moved by is the degree to which their leaders trust each other, and truly see each other as part of a family and community.
This is not something one whips into existence overnight. It is borne from having gone through thick and thin together for years, or sometimes even decades. It creates strong personal bonds, and a feeling that you do this work not just for yourself or for the nation, but for your brothers and sisters as well.
I’ve also reflected on what kind of people are drawn to what type of organisation.
Political parties are often a route to fame and riches. There are no riches, and very little fame, in an organisation like Abim. There is pretty much only work – and a somewhat endless supply of it.
The flip side of that of course, is that it tends to attract a certain type of person – the type of person who is more interested in trying to contribute some good to the world around them, rather than making a quick buck.
As alluded to in my first point, this does not mean they are financially naive. It just means that if huge sums of money are the most important thing in your life, you’d be pretty stupid to devote your time to an organisation like Abim.

What I Learned From ABIM

Aug 12, 2020
Hit: 4
What I Learned From ABIM

 

ALL THE PIECES MATTER

Thursday, 06 Aug 2020
By Nathaniel Tan
TODAY, the sixth of August, is the Muslim Youth Movement Malaysia’s (Abim) 49th anniversary.
In the past year or so, I’ve gotten to know the organisation and its leaders quite well. Long story short, it’s been a fascinating and inspiring journey.
I’ll share three things I’ve learned from Abim for now: successful models of grassroots activism, the ways in which religion can play a positive role in activism and governance, and the value of personal bonds in a movement.
Before I continue, it is very much worth noting that a lot of these qualities and lessons can be found in other similar organisations and movements – be it other religious-based movements like Pertubuhan Ikram Malaysia, or secular grassroots movements like Liga Rakyat Demokratik.
I assume none of the rest are celebrating their anniversary today as well, so I hope it’s okay if I focus on the one organisation here.
The initial model that inspired the founding of many movements like Abim is of course that of the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.
The Muslim Brotherhood is not without controversy, and the many similar organisations founded across the world share different levels of affiliations with the Muslim Brotherhood today.
A defining feature of these movements mirrors the manner in which Islam emphasises being an all-encompassing way of life, in that it is common for these movements to be involved in a wide array of activities.
These include, but are not limited to, the founding of institutions of learning (from preschools to universities), hospitals, charities, social service centres, and so on. (It is worth noting that PAS operates in this manner as well, and in this sense is extremely different from any other political party in Malaysia).
What makes these organisations a little different from many which work in a similar space within civil society is the manner in which they are financially self-sustaining. In this regard, they are perhaps more similar to social enterprises than to “NGOs”, as we commonly understand the term.
I think this is an important and very useful quality, in forming a long term, sustainable movement. It is a completely different model than having to rely on grants, charity, or other types of handouts, and imbues the organisation with a certain degree of pride and dignity that inspires a particular type of confidence amongst its members.
I might summarise my second point in the saying: “You Islam, I okay”.
I believe Islamophobia is a very real thing, especially among non-Muslims (like myself) in Malaysia.
I’m not saying that there aren’t people here and around the world who do try to force their religion on you in insidious ways. It happens with Muslims, just as it happens with Christians and various other religions in pockets all over the world.
That said, I think it is always, always helpful to not paint everyone who shares a label with the same brush.
One of my more profound experiences with Abim was accompanying them in the delivery of some food aid during the movement control order (MCO) period.
This was one of a regular set of engagements that Abim has had with the NGO Pertubuhan Pembangunan Kebajikan dan Persekitaran Positif Malaysia (SEED), which describes itself as the “first trans-led community based organisation in Malaysia”.
SEED has an office in an area of Chow Kit (in Kuala Lumpur) some might describe as seedy, and serves communities like transgenders and “women of socially excluded communities”.
These are not the types of people that you would imagine an Islamist organisation going out of its way to help.
I can personally bear witness to the fact that there was no preaching, no handing out of pamphlets, and no attempting to convert or get people to “repent”. (I imagine there is no way SEED would have let them do that anyway).
There was only the giving out of very large boxes (sponsored by other donors in this case, I believe) of food and supplies – boxes that I was nowhere near strong enough to help carry for the entirety of the time.
I think the experience was just one of many I had that really ran counter to the narrative that all Islamic organisations are the same, that they all want to convert you, and so on.
This was one of many times that I saw a focus on Islamic principles and values, rather than the outward manifestations and trappings. I saw firsthand so many times the emphasis on compassion and aid to all who suffer – not just all who look or talk like them, or shared the same beliefs.
I think religious revivalism is a very real phenomenon – but also not necessarily one that needs to be as polarising as it has been in the past. As what may be a growing number of Malaysians are putting religion in the centre of their lives, it is vital that we continue to build bridges and recognise the common humanity between those who have different views on religion and secularism.
Thus far, I have found the people at Abim to be amazing partners in this endeavour, and I think if you take the time to get to know them yourselves, you are likely to have a similar experience.
I have spent a fair amount of time reflecting on and experiencing firsthand how movements and organisations work.
I confess, I’ve sat through countless meetings where I’m quietly watching mini ego wars and power plays unfold, thinking to myself this group is not really going anywhere – and seeing firsthand how trust deficits really scuttle even the best intentions.
Abim’s leaders are nowhere near perfect. I’m not here to over romanticise them, or paint them as some sort of angels.
But what I have observed is the value of being together, working towards the same goals, for a long time. What I’ve really been moved by is the degree to which their leaders trust each other, and truly see each other as part of a family and community.
This is not something one whips into existence overnight. It is borne from having gone through thick and thin together for years, or sometimes even decades. It creates strong personal bonds, and a feeling that you do this work not just for yourself or for the nation, but for your brothers and sisters as well.
I’ve also reflected on what kind of people are drawn to what type of organisation.
Political parties are often a route to fame and riches. There are no riches, and very little fame, in an organisation like Abim. There is pretty much only work – and a somewhat endless supply of it.
The flip side of that of course, is that it tends to attract a certain type of person – the type of person who is more interested in trying to contribute some good to the world around them, rather than making a quick buck.
As alluded to in my first point, this does not mean they are financially naive. It just means that if huge sums of money are the most important thing in your life, you’d be pretty stupid to devote your time to an organisation like Abim.
Read 4 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Golongan B40 terima impak besar akibat Covid-19: Dr.Muhammed Khalid

 

KUALA LUMPUR - Golongan bawahan dan berpendapatan rendah di negara ini seperti peniaga kecil, pelajar dan graduan akan menerima kesan ekonomi susulan pandemik koronavirus (Covid-19).

Ahli Lembaga Pemegang Amanah Institut Penyelidikan Ekonomi Malaysia (MIER), Dr Muhammed Abdul Khalid berkata, berdasarkan data bermula Februari sehingga Jun, jumlah peratusan tidak bekerja meningkat dan kadar pengangguran dicatatkan sebanyak 4.9 peratus.

"Daripada angka ini, ia merupakan jumlah tertinggi dalam tempoh 30 tahun. Kumpulan terkesan yang pertama ialah golongan bekerja sendiri dan berpendapatan rendah di mana terdapat 2.3 juta orang. Kedua ialah kanak-kanak daripada soal pendidikan dan nutrisi makanan dan ketiga ialah graduan yang baru keluar dan ingin mencari pekerjaan.

"Golongan 'Mak Cik Kiah' ini kalau dia tidak boleh buka kedai, dia akan hilang pendapatan dan modalnya tidak boleh digandakan. Tidak seperti mereka makan gaji, walaupun kehilangan pekerjaan, untuk tempoh enam bulan ada skim yang mampu membantu mereka," katanya pada Live Facebook Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) bertajuk 'Ekonomi Rakyat Pasca Covid-19' di sini hari ini.

Muhammad berkata, isu nutrisi makanan dalam kanak-kanak terutama pelajar di beberapa negeri seperti Kelantan, Terengganu dan Pahang menjadi antara krisis utama kepada negara pada masa sekarang.

"Jika sebelum ini, setiap pagi pelajar-pelajar yang terpilih di bawah Program Rancangan Makanan Tambahan (RMT) akan mendapat makanan dan nutrisi yang mencukupi sebelum memulakan pembelajaran. Terdapat kira-kira 500,000 pelajar yang menerima manfaat ini.

"Selain itu soal pendidikan pula kalau kita lihat sepanjang Perintah Kawalan Pergerakan (PKP) sebelum ini, 90 peratus pelajar di negeri-negeri miskin seperti Kelantan, Kedah dan Sabah tidak mempunyai komputer riba bagi tujuan pembelajaran. Isu pembelajaran ini kesannya panjang," katanya.

Selain itu, beliau berkata, seramai 175,000 graduan yang menamatkan pengajian memasuki pasaran buruh.

"Apabila ekonomi menguncup, peluang pekerjaan juga terjejas. Mereka ini akan tertekan kerana syarikat tidak melabur dan sediakan peluang pekerjaan," katanya.

Mengulas lanjut, beliau berkata, impak Covid-19 kepada ekonomi Malaysia lebih buruk berbanding krisis ekonomi 1998 dan 2008 apabila ramai golongan bawah tertekan dengan keadaan semasa.

"Sektor ekonomi negara tidak berkembang dengan baik dan menguncup. Kedua, ekonomi Malaysia sebanyak 40 peratus ialah daripada pelaburan luar. Jika negara luar tidak rancak, kita juga akan seperti mereka," katanya.

Ditanya adakah jurang kaya dengan miskin semakin melebar, Muhammad berkata, jurang berkenaan sudah melebar sejak 2016 hingga 2019 lagi dan apabila Covid-19 ini melanda ia akan semakin bertambah.

"Peratusan B40 akan semakin meningkat dan T20 akan kekal kerana tidak begitu terkesan sebagaimana golongan bawahan ini.

"Kadar kemiskinan juga akan meningkat kerana peluang pekerjaan semakin kecil dan ditambah dengan jumlah mereka menganggur dan kehilangan pekerjaan. Ini perkara yang perlu diperhalusi dan dilihat sebaik mungkin oleh semua pihak terutama kerajaan," katanya. Sumber Berita & Gambar:- Sinar Harian. Video Forum boleh tonton pada poster di bawah.

dr muhammed khalid video

 

 

Read 5 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Lima Dekad Penubuhan ABIM: Merangka Transisi Dalam Tajdid Islami

 

Lima Dekad Penubuhan ABIM

Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) memasuki dekad yang signifikan, bagi mengemudi Tajdid Islam dalam era peralihan menuju ke lima puluh tahun penubuhannya. ABIM ditubuhkan pada 6 Ogos 1971 dan menjadi organisasi Islam terawal di Malaysia yang membawa risalah tokoh Islah dan Tajdid,  Imam Hassan Al-Banna – pelopor gerakan Islam dalam sejarah dunia moden.

Pada masa yang sama, ABIM juga terbentuk daripada acuan pelbagai aliran pemikiran termasuk dari para sarjana tempatan dan rantau ini yang dipimpin oleh Syed Muhammad Naquib Al-Attas, Mohammad Natsir dan Buya Hamka.

Kemahiran Syed Naquib dalam seni juga mempunyai pengaruh yang besar terhadap ABIM kerana dialah yang merekacipta logo rasmi ABIM yang menjadi lambang aktivisme ABIM hingga ke hari ini.

Ulama terkenal lain seperti Ismail Raji Faruqi dan Yusuf Al-Qaradhawi juga membentuk pemikiran gerakan dan karya mereka selalu dirujuk dan dibincangkan semasa usrah mingguan.

Keterbukaan dalam menelaah rencam intelektual ini menjadi pemangkin kepada ABIM untuk terus maju dalam menangani perubahan untuk memastikan bahawa elemen pemugaran Islam berkembang dalam idea dan aktivisme.

Memahami Islah dan Tajdid Islam

Islah dan Tajdid bukan lagi topik baru seperti yang dibahaskan oleh beberapa pihak. Ia telah dibahas sejak abad ke-16 dengan munculnya tokoh-tokoh di Asia Tenggara dengan sumbangan besar untuk mereformasi budaya masyarakat dan tasawur mereka.

Di antara tokoh-tokoh ini ialah Abdul Raof Singkel, sarjana yang berpegang pada prinsip,  mengiktiraf hak wanita untuk menjadi Sultan di Acheh walaupun majoriti ulama pembawaan tradisional ketika itu tidak bersetuju.

Ulama lain termasuk Nurudin al-Raniri dan Syeikh Yusuf Al-Makassari yang telah menyedarkan masyarakat dalam menerapkan pemahaman rasional mengenai sufisme dalam Islam dan mereformasi sistem keadilan pentadbiran di negeri masing-masing ketika kedua-duanya dilantik sebagai Mufti.

552e21257b8c2d9ca6b5001557f83918

Gerakan Reformis Islam memasuki fasa kedua pada abad ke-18 sebagai tindak balas terhadap penjajahan Barat. Fasa ini menyaksikan kemunculan tokoh seperti Muhammad Abduh, Rashid Ridha, Hassan Al-Banna dan yang seumpamanya dengan panji kata ‘Kebangkitan Islam’.

Tokoh-tokoh ini telah mengambil jalan pertengahan dalam menanggapi penjajahan dengan menerima pengetahuan dan kemajuan teknologi sebagai alat untuk membebaskan masyarakat Muslim dari kemunduran ekonomi.

Pada masa yang sama, mereka mengangkat pemikiran rasional ajaran Islam dalam konteks sistem kehidupan politik dan sosial, dan seterusnya bersedia menerima sistem demokrasi berparlimen sebagai sistem baru di dunia Muslim.

Mereka melihat penjajahan dengan dua cara. Pertama, mereka dengan teliti mengkaji kelebihan yang ada di sebalik penjajahan di dunia Muslim dan bagaimana kelebihan tersebut dapat dimanfaatkan sepenuhnya agar memimpin umat Islam bangkit dari zaman kemunduran.

Pada masa yang sama, mereka mengakui perlunya meningkatkan pemahaman tentang Islam melalui dakwah intensif ‘Islam sebagai cara hidup’.

Dalam konteks dunia Melayu, penubuhan ABIM mempunyai kaitan langsung dengan agenda penegasan semula identiti orang Melayu dan kembali untuk memahami Islam sebagai cara hidup.

Agenda-agenda ini sangat diperlukan memandangkan ratusan tahun Tanah Melayu berada di bawah pengaruh penjajahan barat, era yang ditulis sebagai “tempoh waktu de-Islamisasi dan sekularisasi” oleh M Rasjidi dalam“The Role of Christian Mission: The Indonesian Experience” – “Peranan Misi Kristian: Pengalaman Indonesia ” dalam International Review of Mission.

Fakta serupa diolahkan oleh Dr Siddiq Fadzil bagi menunjukkan bahawa “pembaratan-sekularisasi politik Melayu secara rasmi dimulai pada tahun 1874 dengan Perjanjian Pangkor yang menyiratkan dikotomi yang jelas antara agama dan politik.”

ABIM telah mencetuskan anjuran perbincangan mengenai buku-buku “Islam & Sekularisme” dan “Islam dalam Sejarah dan Kebudayaan Melayu” oleh Syed Muhammad Naquib Al-Attas. Beberapa ideanya kemudian diterima sehingga mempengaruhi  penubuhan Universiti Islam Antarabangsa Malaysia (UIAM) dan ISTAC.

Kewujudan tajdid dan islah dalam Islam perlu difahami sebagai datang dari keyakinan dan kepercayaan yang kuat bahawa Islam sebagai agama ketuhanan mendorong keterbukaan dalam menerima islah.

Bilangan ahli falsafah yang berkembang dalam bidang keilmuan Islam dari satu era peradaban ke era yang lain jelas menggambarkan suasana yang terbuka dan fleksibel di dunia Islam.

Oleh itu, bukan sikap atau pendekatan gerakan Reformis Islam untuk bersikap apologetik terhadap apa tanggapan pengkritik Islam atau gerakan Islam – iaitu kita tegaskan bahawa persekitaran terbuka untuk wacana memang berasal dari keyakinan bahawa Islam memperjuangkan kemajuan, kebebasan, keadilan dan hak asasi manusia.

Idealisme Transisi Pardigma Gerakan Islam

Libat serta, Islah dan Akauntabiliti

Setelah beberapa abad memberikan sumbangan yang besar kepada dunia Islam, intipati Tajdid dan Islah Islam harus diterima secara menyeluruh dan relevansinya dipertahankan dengan memperkayakan pengisian wacana asasi dan idealismenya.

Pertembungan idea dalam pemikiran tertentu dalam tajdid Islam tidak lagi dapat dijadikan tema yang menambat kemajuannya.

Gerakan Islam harus melampaui dan menjangkau lebih jauh daripada kerangka kolonial, pasca-penjajahan dan kejatuhan kekhalifahan dalam konstruk ideologi mereka.

Dunia masakini menuju kepada objektif bersama seluruh warga antarabangsa. Ini dapat dilihat melalui Matlamat Pembangunan Lestari (SDG) 2030 –  iaitu bagaimana umat manusia bercita-cita dengan nama persaudaraan global saling membantu mengangkat martabat dan prestij manusia tanpa meninggalkan sesiapa pun.

Persoalan yang dihadapi kita sekarang ialah – bagaimana Islah dan Tajdid Islam dapat memanfaatkan objektif bersama ini untuk membawa pembangunan lestari sebagai mekanisme penyelesaian terhadap masalah-masalah kemunduran di negara-negara Muslim?

Wacana Islah (reformasi) harus lebih dimengerti melalui konteks realitas, yang sama dengan perlunya memiliki ijtihad (penalaran hukum) sebagai panduan dalam menghadapi pembaharuan dan perubahan dalam masyarakat yang sedang membangun.

Dalam sejarah penyesuaian masyarakat terhadap perubahan, pertembungan antara tradisi dan modenisasi sering terjadi yang akhirnya menghalang masyarakat ke hadapan. Ini kemudian menjadi objektif Tajdid Islam untuk menjadi medium pertengahan untuk mengimbangi perbezaan dan mencari jalan untuk mengembangkan budaya baru dan cara berfikir masyarakat daripada terus jumud, dan membawa masyarakat ke arah kemajuan dan mengikuti perubahan.

Oleh itu, agenda untuk membawa islah atau pemugaran tidak dibatasi dalam kerangka hitam-putih atau konfrontasi, tetapi harus bersifat inklusif, membina jambatan dan menghargai spektrum luas dan struktur masyarakat pelbagai kaum, berkongsi rasa kepemilikan dengan semua anggota masyarakat.

Ini termasuk berkongsi aspirasi dan agenda dengan semua rakyat dan pihak mempunyai hak. Kerjasama ini tidak boleh hanya terbatas pada kegiatan yang dimulakan, tetapi juga dari segi objektif untuk membawa reformasi demi kemajuan masyarakat.

Di dunia nyata hari ini, terdapat pelbagai pihak berkepentingan yang masing-masing berusaha untuk menyumbang kepada masyarakat. Salah satu contoh penting ialah kebangkitan ‘milenial’ yang menjadi kekuatan dalam memperjuangkan ‘ekonomi gig’ – ‘pekerja bebas’ dan membantah perubahan iklim. Pertumbuhan kumpulan ini tentunya memerlukan libatserta dan kolaborasi pintar dengan gerakan Islam.

Di samping itu, para Reformis Islam harus benar-benar  mempunyai komitmen untuk memenuhi matlamat tertinggi dari ideanya iaitu untuk membawa kesejahteraan kepada masyarakat. Kelaziman buruk iaitu menganjur idea tanpa dipertanggungjawabkan terhadap kesan idea itu terhadap masyarakat seharusnya tidak lagi berlaku.

Oleh yang demikian, konsep politik berjalur agama harus membawa maksud universal iaitu untuk memberikan keadilan dan hak kepada semua manusia, dan tidak boleh terbatas pada penubuhan “negara Islam” misalnya.

Kegagalan untuk memahami objektif menggabungkan politik dan agama akan mendedahkan agama dan kuasa untuk  dimanipulasi oleh mana-mana rejim bagi menganiaya dan menindas rakyat atas nama agama.

Pendirian dan kedudukan yang sama juga perlu bagi menangani isu pelaksanaan Syariah – Syariah mesti  menjadi proses yang penting demi menjamin kesejahteraan masyarakat.

Tanpa mempertimbangkan dua aspek ini, kita meramalkan timbulnya masalah gerakan Islam dalam arena politik yang digambarkan sebagai “tidak bersedia untuk memerintah secara efektif, tidak telus, mengabaikan dasar awam dan visi strategik negara” oleh Fawaz A Gerges dalam bukunya “Making The Arab World: Nasser, Qutb, And The Clash That Shaped The Middle East.”

Secara keseluruhan, seperti yang telah diketengahkan, gerakan Islam, melalui prinsip Islah, bersama dengan usaha libatserta dan akauntabiliti yang kuat dapat posisi yang tinggi dan tetap relevan di mata masyarakat.

Pembaharuan pemikiran transisi ini akan memperkayakan khazanah Reformis Islam agar lebih luas serta lebar jangkauannya dan dapat dirujuk oleh generasi akan datang bagi menyediakan penyelesaian untuk masyarakat di masa depan.

Read 6 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Dae'i Backpackers ABIM Sabah Di Ranau Featured

Aug 11, 2020
Hit: 10
Written by
Dae'i Backpackers ABIM Sabah Di Ranau
 
 
7 Ogos - 9 Ogos 2020, RANAU - Siswazah Muda ABIM (SISMA) Sabah dengan kerjasama ABIM Daerah Ranau dan Gabungan Pelajar Islam (GPI) Ranau telah mengadakan program Dai'e Backpackers (Siri 1) bertempat di kawasan pedalaman Kg. Sumbilingon, Ranau. Program ini telah disertai seramai 23 orang peserta dari lingkungan umur 7-12 tahun.
 
daie backpackers
 
Matlamat program ini ialah mendekati masyarakat desa untuk menjalankan aktiviti dakwah secara dekat dan mengagihkan bantuan asas kepada yang memerlukan, merumuskan kepentingan Fardhu Ain dan Fardhu Kifayah dalam kalangan pelajar sekolah rendah dan membina pemahaman Islam, iman dan ihsan yang kukuh dalam diri. Antara aktiviti yang dijalankan ialah klinik solat, klinik mengaji, explorace, sukaneka dan lain-lain lagi.

Semoga syiar dakwah terus tersebar meluas tanpa dibatasi dengan sempadan.

"Jelajah Islah Tanpa Sempadan"

.............

Hebahan oleh,
Unit Media & Arkib
ABIM Sabah

Read 10 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)

ABIM Edar Pelitup Muka Percuma Khas Untuk B40 Featured

Aug 04, 2020
Hit: 48
Written by
ABIM Edar Pelitup Muka Percuma Khas Untuk B40
 
 
 
Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM) amat perihatin dengan penguatkuasaan pemakaian pelitup muka di bawah Akta Pencegahan dan Pengawalan Penyakit Berjangkit 1988 [Akta 342] yang dilihat boleh membebankan golongan yang tidak berkemampuan untuk memakai pelitup muka pakai buang yang standard setiap masa.

Apa lagi dalam situasi ekonomi yang amat meruncing kini, pasti banyak keperluan lain yang perlu diberi keutamaan oleh mereka untuk dibelanjakan melibatkan keperluan asas. Justeru, untuk permulaan, ABIM mengedarkan 2000 Pelitup Muka untuk golongan B40 sekitar lembah Klang sejak kerajaan mengumumkan untuk mewajibkan pemakaian pelitup muka di tempat awam beberapa hari yang lalu.

ABIM khuatir sekiranya bantuan sebegini tidak diberi penekanan, tujuan penguatkuasaan undang-undang pelitup muka sebagai mekanisme mencegah penyebaran virus Covid-10 akan dilihat gagal. Ini kerana berkemungkinan besar golongan yang tidak berkemampuan akan menggunakan semula pelitup muka pakai buang berkali-kali yang akan mendedahkan mereka kepada risiko jangkitan.

Maka, sebagai jalan untuk memastikan usaha penguatkuasa mencapai matlamat, ABIM menyeru masyarakat untuk turut sama mengambil inisiatif ini sekurang-kurangnya untuk meringankan bebanan mereka yang tidak berkemampuan. Sekiranya terdapat mana-mana pihak yang ingin salurkan sumbangan menerusi organisasi ABIM, sumbangan boleh dilakukan menerusi Akaun Bank Islam 14-023-01-001117-7 #Mask4needy.

Selain itu, sebagai rekod, sejak Perintah Kawalan Pergerakan PKP dilaksanakan, ABIM telah menyerahkan 6,345 keping pelitup muka untuk 1,269 keluarga B50.

Dalam masa yang sama, ABIM juga menyarankan agar pihak kerajaan turut melihat isu ini dengan lebih serius dengan menyediakan pelitup muka boleh kitar kepada golongan B40 dan pelajar sekolah agar undang-undang yang ingin dikuatkuasakan dapat diikuti dengan baik dan lancar.

Muhammad Faisal Abdul Aziz
Presiden
Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM)
Read 48 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Covic-19:- Islamic Outreach ABIM Kelantan Bantu Masyarakat Orang Asli Di Gua Musang.

 

26hb Julai 2020: Alhamdulillah, Islamic Outreach ABIM Kelantan telah menggerakkan pasukan dari Program Dakwah Orang Asli (PRODOA) dan Misi Kemanusian (MIKA) untuk ke perkampungan Orang Asli yang terjejas akibat wabak Covid-19.

Seramai 254 ketua isi rumah (KIR) telah disantuni. Masing-masing menerima bantuan berbentuk Pek Makanan dan Beras yang berjumlah RM40 per pek hasil sumbangan daripada CIMB Islamic melalui Dato’ Abdul Razak Kechik.

Berikut adalah perkampungan Orang Asli (KOA) yang menerima bantuan:
KOA Galang - 34 KIR
KOA Gertas - 26 KIR
KOA Kampung Baru - 19 KIR
KOA Ladoi - 28 KIR
KOA Hendrop – 14 KIR

Orang Asli

Melihat senyuman pada wajah Orang Asli yang menerima sumbangan amatlah membahagiakan.

Semoga melalui sumbangan yang diberikan dapatlah meringankan beban mereka yang terjejas akibat Covid-19.

Anda sumbangkan, kami sampaikan!

Orang Asli 2

Read 48 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
ABIM Sandakan Sampaikan Sumbangan Kepada Pesakit Buah Pinggang.

 

29hb Julai 2020: Alhamdulillah, sekitar Ziarah Rahmah Aidiladha dan Bantuan Asas Keperluan Harian oleh ABIM Sabah dan ABIM Sandakan di Hospital Duchess of Kent, Sandakan kepada Sdr. Arianto Kasiman, yang menjalani pembedahan buah pinggang, baru-baru ini.

Penerima telah berhenti kerja atas sebab penyakit strok dan isteri suri rumah, serta berteduh kasih dengan mertua.

Beliau tiada pendapatan harian dengan tanggungan 3 orang anak dan 2 daripadanya masih bersekolah.

Terima kasih atas sumbangan orang ramai. Jom hayati ibadah korban. Terima kasih kepada Sdr. Gary Hardin Lugard di atas keprihatinan beliau, berkongsi info atas kesulitan Sdr. Arianto dan isteri, Puan Ardah.

Semoga Tuhan mengurniakan kebaikan atas keprihatinan Sdr. Gary.

ziarah rahmah aidil adha abim sabah 2

Read 51 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Covid-19:-ABIM Perak Hulur Sumbangan Kepada OKU Dan Golongan Miskin Yang Terjejas.

 

15hb Julai 2020: Alhamdulillah, bantuan asnaf Fasa Pertama di Kuala Kuang disampaikan oleh Ketua Biro Guaman ABIM Perak, Sdr. Khairul Anuar Musa. Pada 16hb Julai pula, bantuan Fasa Kedua untuk asnaf dan OKU disampaikan di Desa Tambun, Batu 8, Tanjung Rambutan. Sumbangan turut disalurkan kepada para asnaf kariah Masjid An-Nur Batu 8, Ulu Kinta. Sumbangan daripada USAID dan diselaraskan oleh pihak MARI. Penerima bantuan terdiri daripada pelbagai etnik, agama, jantina dan peringkat umur.

 bantu oku 1

 

bantu oku

bantu oku 2

Read 43 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Page 1 of 103
DMC Firewall is developed by Dean Marshall Consultancy Ltd